Johnson & Johnson isn’t the only company in the mesothelioma news cycle — for the wrong reasons.

Chanel — a manufacturer of numerous skincare products, among other fashion, beauty and accessory commodities — is part of a mesothelioma lawsuit centered around the company’s after-bath talc items. According to the Daily Hornet website, a 65-year-old woman from Miami, Florida, filed the lawsuit in New York.

The woman, who was diagnosed with mesothelioma in September 2019, claims she has regularly inhaled asbestos fibers in these products for nearly 30 years. She used Chanel’s after-bath talcum powders from 1965-1991, according to the Daily Hornet report.

Johnson & Johnson, a manufacturer of talc-based powders, has dealt with similar accusations for years. The corporate giant has been hit with numerous mesothelioma verdicts topping $100 million just in the last year.

Last month, the company chose to stop producing its popular talc-based baby powder amid legal concerns and negative publicity. Health experts have linked the baby powder to mesothelioma due to asbestos contamination.

Johnson & Johnson’s baby powder, just like Chanel’s after-bath products, include talcum powder. This ingredient derives from the naturally occurring mineral talc, which can be ground into a powder for absorbing moisture and keeping skin healthy.

Talc forms and lives close to another mineral, asbestos, and the two often mix together. Loose asbestos fibers can contaminate talcum powder used in health and beauty products.

People who use talcum powder products can breathe in or swallow loose asbestos fibers. These sharp fragments can pierce through cell linings and irritate cells, which can cause mutation and, eventually, a tumor.

Mesothelioma lawsuits, including this one against Chanel, focus on a lack of transparency about known ingredients in the powder. They claim the manufacturers knew asbestos could be present but omitted it as a potential ingredient — and then denied the plausibility of contamination to the public.

Other health and beauty products with talcum powder — and possibly asbestos — include:

  • Children’s toy makeup
  • Cosmetics (eye shadow, lipstick, blush and more)
  • Deodorant
  • Specific vitamins and supplements
  • Talcum powder used in barbershops
  • Toothpaste

According to the Daily Hornet report, the victim in this mesothelioma lawsuit also filed claims against Woolworth (now known as Foot Locker, Inc.) and Publix. These two stores are where she claims to have bought the Chanel talc-based items.

Reports continue to surface regarding talc-based products and mesothelioma. Thankfully, victims are filing lawsuits and holding the manufacturers accountable for unethical business decisions.

If you have mesothelioma and used one of Chanel’s talc-based powders, you can do the same. Email our patient advocates — Jenna Campagna, RN (jenna@mesotheliomaguide.com), or Carl Jewett (cjewett@mesotheliomaguide.com) — to get help with your case.

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Devin Goldan image

About the Writer, Devin Golden

Devin Golden is the content writer for Mesothelioma Guide. He produces mesothelioma-related content on various mediums, including the Mesothelioma Guide website and social media channels. Devin's objective is to translate complex information regarding mesothelioma into informative, easily absorbable content to help patients and their loved ones.

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Devin Golden

About the Writer, Devin Golden

Devin Golden is the content writer for Mesothelioma Guide. He produces mesothelioma-related content on various mediums, including the Mesothelioma Guide website and social media channels. Devin's objective is to translate complex information regarding mesothelioma into informative, easily absorbable content to help patients and their loved ones.