Asbestos long overstayed its welcome as a fixture of American commercial industries.

The problem is asbestos keeps showing up in places and products where it shouldn’t be.

The deadly mineral, which is the only proven source of the aggressive cancer mesothelioma, was again discovered in cosmetics. The Environmental Working Group (EWG) announced the news after organization-commissioned tests found asbestos in two talc-based eye shadow palettes.

The two products were from the brand Jmkcoz. The product names were: 120 Colors Eyeshadow Palette; and Beauty Glazed Gorgeous Me Eye Shadow Tray Palette.

If you or someone you know has mesothelioma and used one of these eye-shadow kits, reach out to our staff. Your cancer might be caused by asbestos in these makeup kits.

Our patient advocate and registered nurse, Jenna Campagna, can answer any questions and help you with financial support options. Email her at jenna@mesotheliomaguide.com.

 

Amount of Asbestos Found in Eye-Shadow Makeup

The asbestos levels found in the eye-shadow palettes was alarming. According to the EWG, the tests found “nearly 3.9 million asbestos fiber structures per gram of eye shadow” in the 120 Colors Eyeshadow Palette, which was still being sold on Amazon as of May 19. It was removed on or before May 26. Of the 45 color shades tested, 40% (18) contained asbestos.

The Beauty Glazed Gorgeous Me Eye Shadow tray Palette was also still available for purchase on Amazon, along with eBay and the Jmkcoz website, as of May 19. The Jmkcoz website still had the product listed for sale on May 26, but the other two sources had it taken down.

The cosmetic had “up to 3.5 million asbestos fiber structures per gram of eye shadow.” The EWG examined 25 shades, and 20% (five) contained asbestos.

Dr. Tasha Stoiber, a senior scientist at EWG, urged everyone who has purchased either cosmetic “for themselves, family or friends” to stop use immediately.

“And we call on these companies and online retailers to immediately pull both of these products from their respective websites,” Dr. Stoiber said. “Asbestos, even at the smallest levels of exposure, can cause serious harm — even death — later in life.”

 

How Asbestos Exposure Leads to Mesothelioma

Asbestos in its natural form is durable, fire-resistant and sturdy. Those characteristics are why industries used asbestos in construction projects, insulation material, electrical wiring, plumbing and more.

This practice continued for most of the 20th century, up until the 1980s when health experts pulled back the curtain to reveal the nasty truth about asbestos.

The mineral is composed of tiny fibers — similar to strands of cloth on a blanket — and they can easily break off. These fibers are weightless and obscure, which is why they float in the air and can be swallowed or inhaled.

They also have sharp edges that can puncture cell linings near the lungs or abdominal cavity. Irritated cells can mutate and lead to cancers like mesothelioma.

Most commercial industries moved away from using asbestos due to the significant health concerns. However, the carcinogen still finds its way into accessible talc-based cosmetics.

 

Why Asbestos Sneaks Into Talc-Based Makeup

Talc, like asbestos, is a naturally forming mineral found in soil. The two share another similarity: geography. Talc and asbestos are neighbors, often populating the same mines and frequently mixing together.

Talc is ground into a powder, called talcum powder, for cosmetics like eye shadow. Talcum powder keeps skin dry and healthy by absorbing moisture and reducing friction. The powder can easily include hidden asbestos particles. This is how people are exposed to asbestos through the use of talc-based makeup.

There have been numerous reports of asbestos found in cosmetics. Just since the start of 2019:

  • EWG tested and identified asbestos in children’s toy makeup (January 2020)
  • Johnson & Johnson recalled some of its Baby Powder after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration found asbestos in product samples (October 2019)
  • The agency revealed asbestos in four talc-based cosmetics produced by Beauty Plus (September 2019)
  • The FDA urged people to stop using Claire’s cosmetic products after finding asbestos in three items (March 2019)

The heightened awareness of asbestos in cosmetics has led to thousands of mesothelioma lawsuits, most centering around Johnson & Johnson Baby Powder.

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Devin Goldan image

About the Writer, Devin Golden

Devin Golden is the content writer for Mesothelioma Guide. He produces mesothelioma-related content on various mediums, including the Mesothelioma Guide website and social media channels. Devin's objective is to translate complex information regarding mesothelioma into informative, easily absorbable content to help patients and their loved ones.

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Show Author

    Devin Golden

    About the Writer, Devin Golden

    Devin Golden is the content writer for Mesothelioma Guide. He produces mesothelioma-related content on various mediums, including the Mesothelioma Guide website and social media channels. Devin's objective is to translate complex information regarding mesothelioma into informative, easily absorbable content to help patients and their loved ones.